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Creating Snow Storms, The Knollenberg Patent

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The engineered cool-downs and artificial snow storms are already in full swing in parts of the US even as the sweltering triple digit heat in the Western US continues to break high temperature records. Most of the population as of yet has no idea that the record cool-downs in a record warm world are anything but natural. Even many anti-geoengineering activists still seem unwilling to connect this important part of the puzzle. The patent below is for the purpose of artificial ice nucleation for weather modification. The climate engineers have been at this for a very long time. This patent is from 1966 but similar patents go all the way back to 1950. The more relevant parts of this patent are highlighted in yellow for easier review. This patent should give pause to those that still doubt the magnitude of what is happening in our skies.  The “weather makers” do in fact “own the weather”, but their ongoing experiments will decimate Earth’s life support systems beyond repair if they are allowed to continue.
Dane Wigington
geoengineeringwatch.org

Click the image to view highlighted patent

patent-3613992,thumb

6 Responses to Creating Snow Storms, The Knollenberg Patent

  1. Paul says:

    Robert G. Knollenberg, is also the inventor of a particle size detection device which was patent in 1986, It seems that he was trying to protect his patent, by offering a device to measure it. I could be wrong here but seem suspicious. In his weather modification method patent, it states clearly 

    "WEATHER MODIFICATION METHOD The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for Governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor."

    Yes as stated  "for Governmental purposes" God only knows, how advanced this technology has come. If the that doesn't make people at least question government I don't know. 

  2. angela says:

    Thats a very insightful report Doc, I hope Dane weighs in on that, I think I have had the same reaction at times, but I also experience extreme heat too, as in constantly needing to wear sandals.

  3. doc noss says:

    Dane, It used to be that if you wanted to produce an ice-cold sensation on your skin, you had to apply rubbing alcohol to the skin and blow on it. Now, the same ice-cold sensation is achieved every time any kind of moisture on my skin is met by any kind of breeze. If I’m perspiring and I sit by a fan, the perspiration turns ice-cold. If I come out of the shower, not completely dry, and sit by a fan, the wet spots turn ice-cold. Every time I go in the ocean and come out, the breeze turns my wet body ice-cold. I live in a hot, tropical climate, so it’s nice to have this “instant cooling system”. But it certainly isn’t natural, it’s very ominous, and I’m wondering if the same chemicals described in this patent for ice nucleation are also getting on our own skin and causing endothermic reactions?

  4. andrew says:

    thanks Dane, will use this in my next ’round robin’ email (Cold Clouds, Hot Sun), will also reference EP1491088A1.

  5. Alan says:

    the engineered snowstorm of May 1 2013 was too bizarre! The snow looked like murky foam. I think the ptb said hey lets see if we can make it snow in May….the snow fell from arkansas to minnesota. 17 inches in Red Wing Minnesota reported, pulling down trees and branches.
    Totally engineered, asked Paul Douglas meteorologist…oh wait, he wont tell, but i know he was miffed at the geo-engeneers for just missing his Twin cities when a few hours before the storm Douglas was reporting that the snow would hit the twin cities….

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